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[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Defending Their Own
by Dialecticdreamer/Sarah Williams
part 2 of 6
word count (story only): 1449


:: Part of the Polychrome Heroics universe, and the Mercedes subset, while taking the “Road Trip” in an entirely new direction. ::


Pay Special Attention: People who have been profiting from human trafficking have parts of their reality (and sometimes their bodies) folded into several sharp points which may not match any previously known 'safe' configuration. ::




Joshua had just turned toward the nearest stairwell when G called, “Dad?”

“There was an injury,” he responded immediately. “Did you leave your earthquake preparedness bag in your backpack?” When G nodded, Joshua asked, “Can you fetch it for us? I think we might need some of the tools.” The teen dashed off.

“Why do you want an earthquake bag?” Willem asked. Joshua faced him, shading his eyes with one hand. Behind them both, Orris led the teleporter to a table one row over, holding her elbow as she eased, shivering, into a chair. Despite the movement, she barely slowed the spoon delivering bite after bite of lemon gelato.
Read more... )

Poll: Poetry Themes for Late 2017

Jul. 24th, 2017 01:35
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poll invites audience feedback about themes proposed for the Poetry Fishbowl dates in late 2017. Everyone is eligible to vote in this poll. I will keep it open until at least Monday night, and then I need to close it so I can post the advance announcement on Tuesday.

The structure uses checkboxes. There are 38 themes after condensing similar ones and dropping things we've already covered. You may vote for as many themes as you would enjoy prompting/sponsoring in a fishbowl. I recommend that you don't vote for ALL of them, so as to help narrow down to favorites.

Read and vote! )

My Favorite Characters

Jul. 24th, 2017 06:00
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Posted by Julianne Lee

Lately I’ve been asked several times who my favorite character is in Her Mother’s Daughter. Particularly, I’m asked about the fictional characters, because the historical figures are who they were and I must portray them as believably themselves.

But with the fictional folk I get to decide who they are, and even within the requirements of plot that leaves me a lot of room for creativity. Some of them end up being like people I’d want to know, and others not so much. But…favorite? Some may stand out more than others. Even the bad guys can hold a special place in my personal pecking order. A clearly imagined and well-crafted villain is as much a pleasure to read or write as the most stalwart yet Achilles-heeled hero.

For Her Mother’s Daughter there weren’t terribly many fictional characters. The story spans the entirety of Mary Tudor’s life, and that life was filled with well-known people. A few of the point-of-view characters are fictional, and among those I suppose the one who strikes me as most likeable is Niccolò Delarosa, the lute player.

In the story he first appears as a musician in Henry’s court, when Mary begins her rehabilitation to her father’s good graces after the death of Anne Boleyn. He’s an Italian of ordinary lineage, but his proficiency with his instrument and his ability to keep his head down and his mouth shut earn him a career in the royal court. And, to his great agony, he has a crush on the king’s daughter. Poor Niccolò spends the next two decades or so, in Henry’s court then in Mary’s, cherishing her. So near, and yet so far. She longing to be loved, and he wishing to oblige, but never able to say so or express his feelings in any way. Over the years he observes the failure of her marriage, and her unhappiness, unable to do anything about it.

I see him as an ordinary guy with a good heart. A solid citizen, good at his job, and loyal to his master and then his mistress. To me, he falls into the category of the sort of guy I’d like to know. The sort who are all too rare in real life. They exist—I’ve known some—and Niccolò is the essence of those good men I’ve known.

But by far the best of the good guys I’ve written was Dylan Matheson. In my first published novel the main character was a classic fish-out-of-water, ordinary-guy-in-extraordinary-circumstances, square-jawed hero. He was a joy. It amused me to hear about him from readers, for it seemed the women all wanted to meet Dylan and the men all thought they were just like Dylan. (I think we should get them all together!)

Son of the Sword is a time travel story in which a modern guy is swept back to 18th century Scotland and the Jacobite Rebellions. There he meets the love of his life, Caitrionagh, and heroism ensues with the aid of an irrepressible Irish faerie named Sinnan. He was with me for three novels, and when it was time to say goodbye in the fourth book, writing his death scene was like pulling teeth. I didn’t want to do it, but it was time.

Each time I end a book or a series I have to leave characters and move on to new ones. It’s tempting to continue the story past its true ending, but that doesn’t serve the narrative or the audience. Once Dylan’s story was done, he had to die.

Having written sixteen novels for publication, and twelve unsold manuscripts before that, I’ve said goodbye to dozens of characters. But Dylan is the one I remember most fondly.

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Pard: An Interrupted Nap

Jul. 24th, 2017 06:00
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Posted by Ursula K. Le Guin

Pard: An Interrupted Nap

Linda Long, photographer.
Marilyn Reaves, distracter.
U.K. Le Guin, skritcher.

Pard: Photo by Linda Long

Pard: Photo by Linda Long

Pard: Photo by Linda Long

Pard: Photo by Linda Long

Click on pictures for larger images

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hi

Jul. 24th, 2017 02:15
wohali: photograph of Joan (Default)
[personal profile] wohali
sorry for the absence. been kinda busy. trying to get CouchDB 2.1 out the door. And some bouts of illness.

But this tab is back open again so I'll try and stream-of-consciousness this week.

yay?

Prairie Rose Palzone concert

Jul. 23rd, 2017 23:27
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[personal profile] cathrowan
Tonight at Daravara, 3 excellent singer-songwriters teamed up. Colleen Brown ("love songs"), Kimberly MacGregor ("hate songs"), and Amy Van Keeken ("weird zone") took turns at lead. This was concert five of five in their mini-tour and they'd had time to polish up the backup and harmony vocals. I'd heard Colleen Brown on CKUA, but this was the first time live. There is something about her alto that just hits a sweet spot for me. A fine evening.

some things

Jul. 23rd, 2017 22:13
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[personal profile] thistleingrey
* I was reminded of Happy Together, last mentioned here two years ago, when Reason requested a Song So-hee clip from YouTube as bedtime music and YouTube's sidebar suggested the HT episode on which she'd appeared in 2014. (Reason is fascinated by a young entertainer; I ...want Song So-hee to continue maturing so that her voice sounds less shrill.) They seated her in the prestige spot, but she's youngest of the five guests on that ep and she knew it; she has restrained manners.

Anyway (I didn't watch the whole thing), then the sidebar suggested the 2014 HT featuring Jackie Chan, Narsha, and [Choi] Siwon. omg. (KBS is kind: HT ?always has English subtitles.) Chan speaks a bit of Korean, and the dour co-host speaks some Mandarin, so they patched the opener into a hilarious moment in which Chan (by far the eldest person present) says that he'd rather call the lead host "oppa" instead of "hyeong" because it's easier to say. In general, oppa is what a girl or woman might call a slightly older male person whom she considers close, or the term she'd use for an actual older brother; hyeong is what a boy or man would use for an older male person, similarly, except not so similar, is it, when most young women with boyfriends call the bf "oppa" too. And then Chan addresses the co-host as eonni (older sister if you're a female speaker). :P As the host remarks near the four-minute mark, everyone's wearing headsets so that offstage translators can supply the guests and hosts with translations as needed, heh. Those translators must be amazing---there's hardly a lag, and the manner of delivery (it's "live" comedy) suggests that they don't cut much during post-production.

Notably, the host calls Chan "seonsaengnim," teacher, which is as it ought to be. One reason that Korea likes Yu Jae Seok---"the nation's MC"---is that he's funny, he pokes at things, yet (at least on this show) he holds a line.

Also, Jackie Chan loves the environment, and he tries to make his staff respect it as well.

And then I stopped watching because sleep matters more, but on another day...

* ...I picked up the "I am from America" HT special (2015) with five guests, three younger and two older. I happen to have seen two (one from each subgroup) in kdramas: Stephanie Lee in Second Last Love and Yi Hyeon U in Dal Ja's Spring. The humor's more predictable because I'm more familiar with the crossings, but I still laughed. Must remember to dip into HT every so often for ear-practice.
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[personal profile] mdlbear

It's been a stressful week. The worst thing to happen, of course, was Jordin Kare's death on Wednesday. Friday we went down to Seattle both to check on the apartment, and to look for a kitten at Cat City. There were some wonderful ones, but they were all on hold. We went on a wild cat chase up to Lynnwood, only to find that the kitten we'd wanted to meet had been adopted while we were on the road.

The second pod was unloaded yesterday, mostly using hired muscle. It filled an appalling amount of space in the garage (I set up the plastic shelves down the center, and there are piles (mostly of book boxes) next to it. So there's that.) I had a bit of a meltdown this morning upacking mostly kitchen stuff, including the Peter Rabbit plate that I'd had as a kid, and realizing that we didn't have nearly enough room for even the reduced amount of stuff we brought, and concerned about money, and, and, and,... The usual stuff that happens when the brain weasels go out to play with the black dog.

We currently have two boxes of stuff to give away, one for my daughter who has just gotten engaged, and a largeish pile for G.

However, despite the stress, our first full week here has mostly been pretty good. Colleen's new caregiver, G", is working out quite well. (Glenn is G; our previous housekeeper, Giselle, was G'. This one is named Gina, so, ... After her I'm switching to subscripts.) Molly, our Chevy Bolt, is finally getting fully charged every day or two. (I am somewhat amused by the fact that she sends me a text when she's done charging. Molly is not amused by being mistaken for a wallboard anchor.)

Our beds are here, but we're waiting until after the new floor is in (Tuesday) to set them up, since moving them would involve taking them apart and setting them up again -- not worth it.

Our cats are at least not fighting; we're still keeping them separate until we can (hopefully) re-introduce them. We've bought a couple of Feliway pheromone diffusers - one for the main area of the house, and one for the room we plan to use for the re-introduction.

I have also replaced the ionization fire detector nearest the kitchen with a photoelectric one. Ionization detectors are sensitive to open flames, and we have a gas stove. Bad combination.

Notes & links, as usual )

thnidu: painting: a girl pulling a red wagon piled almost to her own height of books along a sidewalk (books)
[personal profile] thnidu
If you buy through the Amazon Smile links on the titles, a portion of your purchase price will go to Doctors Without Borders.


Dreadnought: Nemesis - Book One
by April Daniels
(Goodreads, 4.13 stars ·  1,008 Ratings  ·  359 Reviews  )

An action-packed series-starter perfect for fans of Heroine Complex and Not Your Sidekick.

Danny Tozer has a problem: she just inherited the powers of Dreadnought, the world’s greatest superhero.

Until Dreadnought fell out of the sky and died right in front of her, Danny was trying to keep people from finding out she’s transgender. But before he expired, Dreadnought passed his mantle to her, and those secondhand superpowers transformed Danny’s body into what she’s always thought it should be. Now there’s no hiding that she’s a girl.

It should be the happiest time of her life, but Danny’s first weeks finally living in a body that fits her are more difficult and complicated than she could have imagined. Between her father’s dangerous obsession with “curing” her girlhood, her best friend suddenly acting like he’s entitled to date her, and her fellow superheroes arguing over her place in their ranks, Danny feels like she’s in over her head.

She doesn’t have time to adjust. Dreadnought’s murderer—a cyborg named Utopia—still haunts the streets of New Port City, threatening destruction. If Danny can’t sort through the confusion of coming out, master her powers, and stop Utopia in time, humanity faces extinction.


And the sequel has just been released:

Sovereign: Nemesis - Book Two
(Goodreads, 4.05 stars ·  Rating Details ·  44 Ratings  ·  31 Reviews)

The highly anticipated sequel to Dreadnought, featuring “the most exciting new superheroes in decades.” (Kirkus, starred review)


Only nine months after her debut as the superhero Dreadnought, Danny Tozer is already a scarred veteran. Protecting a city the size of New Port is a team-sized job and she’s doing it alone. Between her newfound celebrity and her demanding cape duties, Dreadnought is stretched thin, and it’s only going to get worse.

When she crosses a newly discovered billionaire supervillain, Dreadnought comes under attack from all quarters. From her troubled family life to her disintegrating friendship with Calamity, there’s no lever too cruel for this villain to use against her.

She might be hard to kill, but there's more than one way to destroy a hero. Before the war is over, Dreadnought will be forced to confront parts of herself she never wanted to acknowledge.

And behind it all, an old enemy waits in the wings, ready to unleash a plot that will scar the world forever.


sovay: (Lord Peter Wimsey: passion)
[personal profile] sovay
I did not make it to the last day of Necon due to circumstances falling through, but fortunately [personal profile] handful_ofdust was flying back to Toronto from Boston, so I took the time-honored Sunday combination of very slow buses, trains, and shuttles out to Logan Airport and had a splendid time hanging out for two hours before her flight, even if I still miss being able to walk people to their gates and wave them off onto the plane. We had dinner and talked about everything from neurodiversity to Orson Krennic, Imperial Poseur; I came away richer by a binder of DVDs (through which [personal profile] spatch is happily poring as we speak: "We could watch Moana! You know you've also got Deathgasm? Ooh, Night of the Comet. Logan, that's good") and a Gemma-made necklace of amethyst, pearls, gold and amber glass beads, and a frosted-glass pendant that used to be an earring. Coming back, I foolishly thought it would be faster to cut over to the Orange Line at Downtown Crossing and that is how I spent forty-five minutes asleep in a sitting position on a bench at Sullivan Station because there were no buses and I was very tired. The air was cool and smelled like the sea. The cats came and curled up with me in the last of the sunlight when I got home. Worth it.

concert reviews @Menlo

Jul. 23rd, 2017 21:01
calimac: (Haydn)
[personal profile] calimac
Life goes on, for those of us lucky enough to be alive.

I'm still occupying much of my time at the Menlo festival, where workers are rolling the artificial lawns back onto the gravel, fortunately. My review of last Saturday's first concert, the Italian Baroque one, is up, and I see the Daily Journal has entirely redone its archives. All my past links here to my articles there are dead, though I have redone all the ones on my own webpage list of my journalism.

The second concert of high classics I already mentioned here; and here's the third, Thursday's covering the cusp between Classical and Romantic. That Mendelssohn not only was already composing before Beethoven died, but had heard his late music and was inspired by it, is something I've noted before; and Spohr's octet - which Menlo has played before - was also a then-new work Mendelssohn had heard and absorbed.

In theory I could go on like this - concert 4 with the Schumann/Brahms circle (nothing by Clara, but it does have Joachim) was tonight and tomorrow, and I'd love to attend, but no; my assignments have ceased for the moment and I have other tasks to attend to. But I'll be back later.

In the meantime I did get to the first young performers' concert (10 to 18) on Sunday, including all 3 groups I'd heard Gilbert Kalish coach on Thursday, and I may get to one or two more of those master classes.

I did get to one more lecture, violinist Aaron Boyd's eccentrically-spoken encomium to Fritz Kreisler. His worshipfulness of Kreisler is so great that someone asked if Kreisler had made any recordings that were less than perfect. Well, yes, Boyd admitted, that during Kreisler's last couple decades when he was totally deaf he did make some he should not have; but then Boyd went on to describe how even the deaf Kreisler was so great a player he moved other violinists to tears.

He didn't mention my favorite Kreisler anecdote: the one about the hoax Kreisler pulled by attributing concert pieces to then-obscure Baroque composers, raising a furor when he revealed that he'd composed them himself. Here, for instance, is the concerto he ascribed to Vivaldi. This was written in 1927 when few people had heard much Vivaldi, whose works were only then being unearthed, and didn't know what he sounded like. This sounds more like Bach, or perhaps Handel, to me, except for the final eight bars which must be a total put-on that don't sound like anybody.
musyc: Green background with silver snake illustration (Slytherin: Mascot)
[personal profile] musyc in [community profile] 100words
Title: One Particular Part
Author: Musyc
Prompt: #51, Shakespeare II
Character(s): Draco, Hermione
Rating: Teen
Word count: 100
Warnings: None.

One Particular Part )
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[personal profile] marycatelli in [community profile] picture_prompt_fun
Title: The Tunnel
Fandom: original
Character: original
Length: 228
Rating: G
Read more... )

I survived....barely

Jul. 23rd, 2017 22:47
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[personal profile] nocturnus33
I survived a work marathon. Ten days of frenzy grant writing. I'm exhausted and not quite sure If the project has any chance. I spend several nights awake. I work during my winter break. I'm very demoralised. I finished last Friday. I honestly fear for my mental health, I'm on edge.

Yesterday, I visited mum and dad. It was nice, my dad is adorable and sweet in the most dysfunctional way ever. I love him. Mum is mum, I love her, but it needs a little more effort from my part.

Today we travel back to Talca, with my MIL. 3 hours of dull conversation inside the car. Gosh, the woman is boring!
I fake being asleep like for 2 hours to avoid talking to her. I discovered something funny while faking to be asleep: hubby gets bored with her too. He will never confess it, but I know my man, and I observe their interaction while he thought I was sleeping.

Here are some jewels of my MIL fascinating conversation:

1. It's raining...(Well, duh, there is water falling from the sky)
2. There is fog....(I haven't realised e wwere surrounded by a dense fog)
3. Winter will last until September 21st. ... (Erm....erm...well, doesn't we live in the south hemisphere?)

Honestly, what I'm supposed to answer to such idiotic conversation?:

Yes, it's raining.
Wow, there is fog.
Winter is here.

I have no patience with idiocy.
I don't need an intellectual conversation but please do try not to talk such inane things.
I guess I'll stay late at my office this week to avoid her.

Just one last whine: Is there a way to call MIL in the English language that doesn't involve the word mother?

She hates me. I dislike her. She is not my mother by any means. I'm not her daughter. She avoids greeting me if there is no one to witness her rudeness.

Spanish is a much better language. "Suegra" is not a sweet word. Suegra is an ugly word, with no music on it. No pretence of anything, it doesn't suggest any bond apart from being the mother of your husband.

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